The Real Horrors of Night Trekking  

IMG_20190224_102339-01-01.jpeg
Pamutan Grassland Monolith (c) Laag Sparkles

The more you experience the outdoors, the more you’ll crave for more – more challenges, more adventure. As if long dayhikes are not enough, Epifanio came up with another crazy idea over the weekday: to hike at night our beloved Spartan Trail. Though I have been familiar with such trail and have experience three days of total darkness inside the country’s largest caving system, just the thought of the trail’s eeriness made me feel hesitant. Imagine, the canopied trails and river system already seemed disturbing at daytime, how much more at night? But well, wild hearts are difficult to tame.

Together with other hiking friends, we gathered at the usual meetup place for Spartan Trail hike – Rustan’s Banawa. Given that it would be everyone’s first time to try a night trek on such trail, the air of discussion was quite chilly. Knowing the risks, the guys made sure that the pack was intact at all times and that the pace was easy to keep up with.

Spartan Trail is divided into four segments: open-trail assault, vastly vegetated downhell, bouldering through the rivers, and unlimited assaults to Bagsakan. On regular days, you’d curse the first part as it leaves no space for hikers to hide from the unforgiving  heat of the sun. But that night was an exemption. The weather favored our pace and allowed us to savor the cold wind as we went up to Monterrazas. On top, we were rewarded by the city’s skyline view which totally fueled us to keep going.

IMG_20190223_212331-01-01.jpeg
L-R: Sir Mark, Epifanio, Idas, Carlo, James, Jet, and Jahmar

After feasting over the beauty set before us, we continue our Spartan Trail down to the river. Knowing how thick the vegetation was, the pace was made slower so as to keep safe everyone. Compared to the first segment, the group was a little quiet while going down. It was technically difficult to find your way around Spartan Trail in between tall grass and bushes, not to mention the time to time scare we felt when we touch or step on something spiky, slimy, or cold. It was a total relief when we all reached the river system.

Honestly, I feared the river of Spartan Trail the most. I couldn’t help but think of an unexpected flood flashing us all out. We all know how fickle weather conditions can be. What if it will suddenly rain and the water level will rise beyond our expectations? You know, those kinds of thoughts.

IMG_20190223_223336-01-01.jpeg
River trek photo op (c) Laag Sparkles

But well, as they say it, there is ultimately strength in groups. Instead of entertaining those thoughts, we all got to enjoy the magic that sparked the ecosystem when nighttime comes. We discovered a number of species that remain hidden in the morning and come alive at night – mudcrabs, river roaches, midnight blooming daturas, freshwater prawns, water gliders, fireflies, and “mysterious bananas”. It felt like we’re on an exploratory segment of “Born to be Wild”.

IMG_20190223_222641-01-01.jpeg
Daturas on trails (c) Laag Sparkles

We took a short time off when we reached the end of the river trek in preparation for the final assault of our Spartan Trail hike to Bagsakan. It was already quarter to twelve when we began ascending the steep trails. Motivated on ending the night’s adventure, the pace started fast. But what we fail to take into consideration was that our stamina were already deteriorating. It was time for sleep after all. We took numerous stops and began hallucinating things – like hunters watching over us, vampires preparing to attack us, manananggals yearning for them boys, and geckos infesting over us. When you are surrounded by tall trees in a secluded part of the city, it’s difficult to refrain from such train of thoughts. Yet in between all these, were words of encouragement and life realizations. We all reached our destination with lights off and everyone enjoying the beauty of darkness partly lighted by the waning moon.

IMG_20190224_010200-01-01.jpeg
Emergency cooking setup (c) Laag Sparkles

Upon reaching the campsite, Idas initiated the cooking of pancit canton and dried squid and fish. Imagine a group of crazy individuals at one in the morning, cooking in front of an automated tubig machine (water source HAHA). We immediately set our camps and hit the sheets right after eating. And as if the night’s adventure was not enough, we went for another four-hour hike to Pamutan Grassland after breakfast and exited to the unbelievable downhell trail to Toong. Trust me, you’ll never want to step on such loose soils again. Nonetheless, we all went home safe and sound.

2019-02-24 08.50.11 1-01-01.jpeg
So this is what they fondly call “Mt. Bagsakan” on Facebook. HAHA
IMG_20190224_101923-01-01.jpeg
Pamutan Grassland (c) Laag Sparkles
IMG_20190224_101114-01-01.jpeg
Unscripted. We actually saw a brahminy kite flying over the area when this shot was taken.

Night treks might sound a little freaky but when you are with people who brings light despite of the darkness, there’s surely nothing to fear for. In fact, night treks are essential during major climbs when the group wants to shorten the number of days for the climb or when they want to experience something that is constrained with time, say sunrise or sea of clouds. Whatever the reason maybe, trekking at night is worth adding into your list of adventure. I hope you’ll find the courage (and set of crazy friends) to try it as well to!

IMG_20190224_082449-01-01.jpeg
The scammed ones HAHA. Thanks for everything people!

Have you tried night trekking as well? Share experience on Facebook or Instagram. Or directly comment them down below. See you on trails… at night?

Advertisements

15 thoughts on “The Real Horrors of Night Trekking  

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s